ADDRESS Mental Health Lab

ADDRESS Mental Health Lab
Advancing Design and Delivery of Responsive, Effective, and Sustainable Services for Mental Health
Alayna L. Park, Assistant Professor
 

Overview

The ADDRESS Mental Health Lab at Palo Alto University (PAU) is dedicated to enhancing human well-being and functioning through improving access to effective and culturally responsive mental health services. Toward this goal, this work currently focuses on three interrelated pursuits: (1) designing and re-designing evidence-based psychotherapies for diverse and dynamic contexts; (2) exploring evidence-based psychotherapy delivery and adaptation in public-sector mental health settings; and (3) mitigating racial and ethnic disparities in mental health care access and quality. To develop sustainable, evidence-informed solutions, this work leverages scientific knowledge (e.g., empirical research, theory) and local knowledge (e.g., provider expertise, consumer preferences) and often occurs within the context of research-practice partnerships with local service systems and organizations.

 

Current Lab Projects

• Facilitators and Barriers to Engaging Underserved Youth: This project seeks to understand community mental health professionals’ experiences working with youth and families from traditionally underserved communities. Fifty-five professionals employed by a large mental health and welfare agency in Southern California completed a semi-structured needs assessment. Professionals were asked broad, open-ended questions about their experiences working with underserved youth and families, as well as more specific questions about how their work is influenced by agency policies and procedures, use of interpretation and translation services, diversity trainings, and the sociopolitical climate. In addition to strengthening fundamental research skills (e.g., reviewing literature, setting up databases, drafting abstracts), students working with these data will gain experience with qualitative coding and analysis and discussing findings with a community partner.
• Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Implementation and Adaptation: In collaboration with researchers at UCLA and the National Center for PTSD, the ADDRESS Mental Health Lab is studying patterns of evidence-based psychotherapy implementation. Students may have opportunities to examine what happens in the therapy room from clinical trials testing psychosocial treatments for youth with emotional and behavior problems, as well as Cognitive Processing Therapy for adults experiencing traumatic stress. Possible research questions include, but are not limited to, the extent to which mental health providers use research evidence, how evidence-based psychotherapies are modified in usual care, and how organizational factors influence evidence-based psychotherapy implementation.
 

Lab Expectations

Expectations of the ADDRESS Mental Health Lab are collaboratively discussed among current lab members and amended at the start of each academic year. In general, lab members are expected to attend weekly lab meetings, attend monthly individual mentoring meetings (additional meetings upon request), and work at least four hours per week on lab projects. During their first year in the lab (2nd year in the program), students will work on an ongoing project to acclimate to the lab, enhance their knowledge of relevant literature, and strengthen their research proficiency. During their second year in the lab (3rd year in the program), students will identify a secondary research question from an ongoing lab project, conduct data analyses, and submit an abstract to a professional conference. Students at this stage of graduate training should also be brainstorming ideas for their dissertations and discussing these ideas during lab meetings and/or individual mentoring meetings. During their third and fourth years in the lab (4th and 5th years in the program), students will focus on their dissertations. Student dissertations are expected to reflect the lab’s current research pursuits (see Overview). Students are
expected to present at least one-first author poster or paper talk and to contribute to at least one manuscript submitted for publication during their time in the lab. Collaboration among lab
members on dissertations or other research projects is highly encouraged. Additional opportunities, including co-authoring empirical manuscripts and book chapters, reviewing manuscripts submitted to scholarly journals, writing grants, collecting data, and meeting with community partners, may be available depending on students’ interests, goals, and willingness to dedicate the necessary time and efforts.
 

Application Process

There will be three (3) openings to join the team in September 2020. (Students may request to start individual mentoring meetings and/or research opportunities in Spring or Summer 2020.) Students interested in joining the lab are asked to submit the following materials to Alayna Park (via email) by the uniform research group application deadline established by PAU (Friday, April 3rd, 2020 at midnight):
1. Cover letter (1-2 pages) describing relevant professional experiences, research interests, and broad career goals
2. Curriculum vitae (please include your email address and phone number)
3. Unofficial PAU transcript
4. Contact information (name, email address, phone number, and relationship to applicant) for two references
Students are encouraged to contact Alayna Park before and/or after the application deadline to explore whether the ADDRESS Mental Health Lab may be a good fit for their graduate training and professional development. Applicants will also be provided with contact information for past undergraduate and graduate student mentees to ask questions about mentoring style or other topics that may inform applicants’ decisions. Per PAU guidelines, status of admittance will not be discussed with applicants prior to the uniform notification date.
 
Notification: Students accepted into the ADDRESS Mental Health Lab will be notified by phone and email on the PAU uniform notification date (Monday, April 27th, 2020).
 

Selected Publications

Park, A. L., Becker, K. D., Boustani, M. M., & Chorpita, B. F. (2019). Decision-making in mental health care: Measuring provider and supervisor use of evidence. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 1-13.
 
Park, A. L., Boustani, M. M, Saifan, D.*, Gellatly, R.*, Letamendi, A., Stanick, C., ... & Chorpita, B. F. (2019). Community mental health professionals’ perceptions about engaging underserved populations. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 1-14.
 
Park, A. L., Moskowitz, A. L., & Chorpita, B. F. (2018). Community-based providers’ selection of practices for children and adolescents with comorbid mental health problems. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 47(5), 796-807.
 
Park, A. L., Tsai, K. H., Guan, K., & Chorpita, B. F. (2018). Unintended consequences of evidence-based treatment policy reform: Is implementation the goal or the strategy for higher quality care? Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 45(4), 649-660.
 
Chorpita, B. F., Daleiden, E. L., Park, A. L., Ward, A. M., Levy, M. C., Cromley, T., ... & Krull, J. L. (2017). Child STEPs in California: A cluster randomized effectiveness trial comparing modular treatment with community implemented treatment for youth with anxiety, depression, conduct problems, or traumatic stress. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 85(1), 13-25.

 

Selected Conference Presentations

Boyd, M.*, Park, A. L., Becker, K. D., & Chorpita, B. F. (2019, November). Supervisory dyad training match and working alliance. In R. E. Kim (Chair) and S. Dorsey (Discussant), From the Ground Up to the Sky: Spanning the Arc of Implementation Supports. Symposium presented at the 53rd Annual Convention of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), Atlanta, GA.
 
Park, A. L., Boustani, M. M., Saifan, D.*, Gellatly, R.*, Gamarra, J.*, Letamendi, A., Stanick, C., Regan J., Perez, G., Manners, D., Reding, M. E. J., & Chorpita, B. F. (2019, November). Providers' recommendations of strategies for engaging traditionally underserved populations in community mental health services. In D. Lakind & A. L. Park (Chairs) and K. D. Becker (Discussant), Maximizing the public health impact of cognitive behavioral science through improving consumer engagement. Symposium presented at the 53rd Annual Convention of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), Atlanta, GA.
 
Park, A. L., Regan, J., Tsai, K. H., Moskowitz, A. L., Daleiden, E. L., Weisz, J. R., & Chorpita, B. F. (2019, November). Using measurement feedback systems to inform complex clinical decisions. In J. Persons (chair) and P. Kendall (discussant), Improving treatment outcomes with clinical decisionmaking tools. Symposium presented at the 53rd Annual Convention of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), Atlanta, GA.
 
Torres Sanchez, A.*, Park, A. L., Boustani, M. M., Saifan, D.*, Gellatly, R.*, Gamarra, J.*, Oh, G.*, Chu, W.*, Letamendi, A., Stanick, C., Regan J., Perez, G., Manners, D., & Chorpita, B. F. (2019, November). Supporting the mental health needs of underserved populations: Provider perceptions of barriers to accessing community resources. In A. L. Park (Chair) and S. Huey (Discussant), Extending the reach of cognitive behavioral science through understanding barriers to service use for
traditionally underserved populations. Symposium presented at the 53rd Annual Convention of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), Atlanta, GA.
 
*denotes student author
 
 
 
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